E-safety

 


Internet safety is important at Skelton Primary School. We believe that the internet is a fantastic resource that can help children to learn, but it is important to use it properly and safely.

At Skelton Primary School, we have learned how to use the internet safely through watching an exciting e-safety performance and these safety messages have been reinforced within the curriculum . Our digital leaders have also designed posters to remind both adults and children how to act responsibly online.


Policy

Click Here to read our E-Safety Policy


Follow our SMART rules: 5 Top Tips to stay safe online!

Safe:
Keep safe by being careful not to give out personal information when you’re chatting or posting online. Personal information includes your email address, phone number and password.

Meet:
Meeting someone you have only been in touch with online can be dangerous. Only do so with your parents’ or carers’ permission and even then only when they can be present. Remember online friends are still strangers even if you have been talking to them for a long time.

Accepting:
Accepting emails, IM messages, or opening files, images or texts from people you don’t know or trust can lead to problems – they may contain viruses or nasty messages!

Reliable:
Someone online might lie about who they are and information on the internet may not be true. Always check information by looking at other websites, in books, or with someone who knows. If you like chatting online it’s best to only chat to your real world friends and family.

Tell:
Tell a parent, carer or a trusted adult if someone, or something, makes you feel uncomfortable or worried, or if you or someone you know is being bullied online.


E-Safety Games


Our Advice

Our Children have some useful hints & tips for keeping safe online.


Resources

Apps Putting Children At Risk
Kidsmart
Childnet Resources
UK Safer Internet Center
Parent Info


How-to Guides

Skelton Primary School acknowledge that children must be at least 13 to register on most social networking websites and, therefore, do not expect children attending the school to be accessing social networking.
Age limits are there to keep children safe so as parents, you shouldn’t feel pressurised into letting younger children join social networking websites.